Early Salisbury Axle Refurb (Brakes, Bearings & Seals)

dcg

Well-known member
Forgot to mention… I tightened up the new pinion self locking nut as tight as I could until the flange started to spin (I used a block of wood and punch method shown in earlier photos). I will tighten it to a 15-30 lb flange pull using one of the methods mentioned earlier.

In hind sight, I would have marked the pinion shaft and nut location and then reused the same nut. Apparently you tighten one mark width past the two marks lining up and you’re golden. I was over zealous and was quick to use my Milwaukee M18 Fuel inpact on the existing nut.

Using the saw horses has made it really easy to flip around as needed.

Note: Don’t keep freshly painted parts where the work is being done. A brass compressor nozzle (used to center the diff gasket on the holes) fell and the sharp threads marred an oil catcher.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Righthand stub, backingplate and oil catcher installed. Used Hylomar AF on the stub axle gasket and Hylomar Aero Grade PL32/M on the oil catcher to backing plate mating surface. Hylomar Aero Grade PL32/M is the superseded product for SQ32/M. Hylomar customer service stated that their Hylomar Blue medium product could be used.

Lbs of torque per the parts manual is 44 to 52. I used 48. Should I re-torque? The manual stated to re-toruqe the diff cover. But not this assembly. I know re-torquing is a no no in some cases. There are no captive nuts, only nyloc nuts.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Retorqued the RH stub axle to flange bolts / nyloc nuts. 48lbs. Sorry for any spelling errors above... I post some using my phone and I'm becoming far sighted. On to the lefthand stub, backingplate and oil catcher.
 

dcg

Well-known member
Lefthand stub, backingplate and oil catcher on and torqued. Will retorque in a bit.

I double checked the drains on the stubs and the drain holes on the backing plates. That they are justified to the bottom.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
I can’t find the torque (lbs ft) for fixing the wheel cylinders to the backing plates in the manual. Not in the index or brakes section.

Does anyone know?
 
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dcg

Well-known member
For brake wheel cylinder to backingplate torque, Z.G. found 11NM in their RN workshop manual. That's what I'm going with.
 

dcg

Well-known member
Brake wheel cylinders and shoes are on. My first set ever. Right side was tough since it was my first time. I scraped up the backing plate fiddling with the shoes and thinking that I could put them on with my hands. Left side was much easier. I was able to rotate the axle with the flange pointing down and pushed down on the rear shoe with a crowbar to insert it into the pivot point. I followed the manual and had watched the Trailfitters Toolbox series on 110 drums. I also read the RN tech tip on 10” drums. I used white lithium on the contact points and snails.

Please double check the work. Thanks.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Sorting out the hubs…

Removed seals (couldn’t wait for the puller to arrive, so I used a claw hammer).
Striped paint.
Removed rust (most).
Degreased.
Chased threads.
Lightly filed any burs.
Test fitted drums, drum screws and drive member bolts.
Started to drift out the bearing cups with a 1/2” brass drift.

Next up… install new bearing cups and then painting the hubs and drums.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Is this grease ok for the bearings and seal lips?
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Working on the bearing cups, bearings and seals. I’ve read the manual and watched a few videos. The manual states to liberally fill the seal cavity (not pack) between the seal lips. States to not touch the lips. Nor does it say to pre-grease the distance piece. These are early stub axles, so only one seal. I would assume a little grease goes on the lips?

What are the best practices for this process?
 

chris snell

Administrator
Callsign: NW5W
Staff member
Don't sweat it. Just rub some grease around the lips. This is just an axle, after all. The only thing you'll want to pay attention to is play on the hub. The rule I've always used is "as tight as you can get it by hand with greasy gloves on a greasy hub nut tool.
 

dcg

Well-known member
I’m finally getting to the hubs. What is the torque setting for the hub locking nut? The manual for my truck just states “tighten the nut”. There is no torque value in the torque index. Thanks.
 

chris snell

Administrator
Callsign: NW5W
Staff member
The big hub nut: use the hub nut socket that everybody sells and turn it with your hands.
Toighten it as tight as you can get it with grease-covered palms and socket.
 

dcg

Well-known member
The big hub nut: use the hub nut socket that everybody sells and turn it with your hands.
Toighten it as tight as you can get it with grease-covered palms and socket.
Use this technique for the inner nut and outer nut then fold the tab washer? Sorry if I was not clear.
 

chris snell

Administrator
Callsign: NW5W
Staff member
Inner nut. Then just tighten the outer nut so that it's snug and fold the washer

This is the tool I'm talking about; when your hands are super greasy from doing the job, it makes just about the perfect amount of torque. Just your hands on the socket, no bar through it.

I've also done a technique to where you tighten it with a wrench until you can't turn the hub easily, the back off a quarter turn to get a tiny little bit of play in the bearings, where they turn without too much trouble.

1629515437962.png
 

dcg

Well-known member
Thanks Chris! Snugging the outer nut matches what I'm reading in my manual. Using a dial gauge (per my manual) is a little fiddly and the adjustment changes once you install a dry tab washer and the outer nut. However, I now know how to use a dial gauge... which was the point. I'm going to use the method you recommend.

I bought a NOS 52mm Sealey Impact Socket 1/2" drive off of eBay for $13. I was pretty excited about it.
 

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dcg

Well-known member
Hubs and bearings are all buttoned up. I'll provide details of what I did at a later time. Drum question:

Can I put a very thin coat of anti-seize on the inside of the drum surface where it meets the hub?

I want to be able to get the drum off, but I don't want the anti-seize to make its way to the braking surface.
 
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