Grenadier

rocky

Well-known member
They had a livestream yesterday. Was only able to catch a few minutes of the US portion, but Raleigh NC is going to be their US base.
 

MountainD

Technical Excellence Contributor
Until there are established warranty centers (within 30 miles at least of me), it’s a no-brained no-go. I’m also worried that Dino fueled vehicles are an endangered species. They won’t outlaw them, but they’ll probably tax gas till it’s painful (like in UK). The writing is on the wall. I almost scrapped the Cummins to do an electric option but that isn’t there yet, either. So negative, ghost rider, the pattern is full…. I’m waiting…
 

Eliot

Active member
an electric option

It’s a fantasy for the foreseeable future.

Imagine a city. Are you building charging stations into every parking space, and into every garage spot?

Are we building new power plants? Where is the money coming from to rebuild our transmission lines, from scratch?

These vehicles are also functionally inferior for the majority of Americans. And a no go, for those who live in the west and deal with long distances, and cold weather.


I think the battery paradigm is just a bad idea. It's inefficient and expensive.
 
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TravelinLight

Well-known member
The more I think about it, the US will see the 2nd possibly 3rd model year by the time it makes it here. That should have years of testing and then at least 1 full year of user testing under it before we see it here. That should really make the product a quality product. That is my hope instead of the opposite, it flames out before it gets here and we all lose our deposits.
 

UnfrozenCaveman

Well-known member
Imagine a city. Are you building charging stations into every parking space, and into every garage spot?
Oh come on ... silly boy, individually owned fossil fueled vehicles won't be allowed to operate in a city ....deleted sour ranting .. this is not the thread for that...
 

Eliot

Active member
The more I think about it, the US will see the 2nd possibly 3rd model year by the time it makes it here. That should have years of testing and then at least 1 full year of user testing under it before we see it here. That should really make the product a quality product. That is my hope instead of the opposite, it flames out before it gets here and we all lose our deposits.

We’re definitely getting a better vehicle.
 

bearskinrug

Well-known member
It’s a fantasy for the foreseeable future.

Imagine a city. Are you building charging stations into every parking space, and into every garage spot?

Are we building new power plants? Where is the money coming from to rebuild our transmission lines, from scratch?

These vehicles are also functionally inferior for the majority of Americans. And a no go, for those who live in the west and deal with long distances, and cold weather.


I think the battery paradigm is just a bad idea. It's inefficient and expensive.
I think hybrid options make sense. Doesn’t make sense not having that option in my mind.
Wouldn’t an all electric option make sense in the mining industry? I think that’s been discussed here before.
One thing I cant get my head around is how hydrogen would work. I’ll admit that my engineering experience ends at playing SimCity as a kid.
 

pmatusov

Technical Excellence Contributor
Callsign: AK6PM
Wouldn’t an all electric option make sense in the mining industry? I think that’s been discussed here before.
It depends.

Electric might make sense for a vehicle that never leaves the mine perimeter - like a staff runabout. The speeds are limited to ~25-35 mph and speed limits are observed, so 300 miles of highway range may translate into a full week of operation within the mine.

But as a vehicle for a prospector/geologist? Hell no.
 

bearskinrug

Well-known member
It depends.

Electric might make sense for a vehicle that never leaves the mine perimeter - like a staff runabout. The speeds are limited to ~25-35 mph and speed limits are observed, so 300 miles of highway range may translate into a full week of operation within the mine.

But as a vehicle for a prospector/geologist? Hell no.
Yea that’s exactly what I mean. I agree that remote travel still demands use of petroleum products. Seems like the everyday movements around mine sites or plants or other industrial type sites could be done efficiently under electric power. But maybe all you need for that is a golf cart, I have no idea. If I were to ask someone, I guess Ineos would be a good choice.
 

javelinadave

Administrator
Staff member
2r78pr.jpg
 

rocky

Well-known member
Said it before, but buddy’s Tesla costs him more to refuel than his Raptor.
And the Tesla’s suspension and steering is unable to handle the roads around here.
We ain’t anywhere as close to mandatory electric cars as some believe.
 

broncoduecer

Technical Excellence Contributor
I think hybrid options make sense. Doesn’t make sense not having that option in my mind.
Wouldn’t an all electric option make sense in the mining industry? I think that’s been discussed here before.
One thing I cant get my head around is how hydrogen would work. I’ll admit that my engineering experience ends at playing SimCity as a kid.
Electric has been around in mining for a number of decades but not as much in the current battery on board that we think of now. Open pit mining the energy demand is just too large to have reasonable payload capability and less interruption to the truck cycle. They have used trolley assist for years since the Diesel engines on large trucks drive AC motors, using a trolley system they can pull line power on main ramps and roads if they have been set up for it.
Underground they are doing more with battery vehicles for production activities but they only last a few hours at best. Light vehicles are gaining traction in mining since the automobile scale is working reasonably well. They have some slick EV land cruiser utes now that have been doing well.
 

jymmiejamz

Founding Member
Callsign: KN4JHI
How far do you guys think most Americans are driving on a regular basis? I don’t think most people are doing long car trips where they don’t have the option of recharging an electric vehicle. Im pretty sure 90% of my driving (including nyc and LA) would be covered by the 31 mile full electric range of a plug in hybrid Range Rover.
 

bamanuke

Member
How far do you guys think most Americans are driving on a regular basis? I don’t think most people are doing long car trips where they don’t have the option of recharging an electric vehicle. Im pretty sure 90% of my driving (including nyc and LA) would be covered by the 31 mile full electric range of a plug in hybrid Range Rover.
380k (80k when I got it in 2006) on the F250, 217k (110k when I bought it in 2011) on the D90, 60k (28k when I got it in 2018) on the Perentie. 1 long trip to Southwest Florida on the Defender and 1 long trip to South Texas on the Ford. Don't see electric as an option for me, "course I don't live in a big city, nor would I care to
 

RBBailey

NAS-ROW Addict
Callsign: KF7KFZ
Small two seat commuter = Electric OK for 50 miles or so per day.
Normal four door vehicles, to something I would use for long trips = Hybrid, or it makes no sense.

That's why I never gave the Rivian a serious look. What do you do after you've gone 350 miles, and are now 2 hours back-roads driving to the nearest fuel station where you could pay to rent their 120v outlet while you sit in their parking lot for 8 hours to recharge?

So gas/diesel is still king till we get serious hybrids, or till we have some big jumps in solar and battery technology.

On another note, I do think there is some risk to the future of Grenadier. In other words, How many do they really expect to sell in the 3rd or 4th or 5th year? Will they essentially sell all that they are going to be able to sell in the first two years? I almost think that is the real reason for the delay to North America. It is a planned delay to get them over that hump to the point where they can still be selling the new vehicles to half the globe, while the other half may be done buying them. I don't know enough about the market potential to speculate more, but it seems to be a potential danger.

Also, I think Grenadier's web site might be crashed off and on right now. I can't go back and drool over my build.
 

Eliot

Active member
How far do you guys think most Americans are driving on a regular basis? I don’t think most people are doing long car trips where they don’t have the option of recharging an electric vehicle. Im pretty sure 90% of my driving (including nyc and LA) would be covered by the 31 mile full electric range of a plug in hybrid Range Rover.

It’s the 10% that’s a problem. People want a car that will do everything. Which is probably why they buy SUVs now.

Refueling is also a practical issue.
 

javelinadave

Administrator
Staff member
A friend here in Phoenix owns a Tesla Model S. He decided to drive with his family to Disney Land in it. A couple of long recharging stops later he said he would never do it again and either buy a fossil fuel burner of rent one for future trips. Pure electric vehicles serve a purpose but once you depart from that prescribed purpose they become very impractical. Until they can be charged in minutes instead of hours or the batteries can be quickly swapped out they will never become mainstream for anybody other than stationary urbanites or frequent flyers.
 

jymmiejamz

Founding Member
Callsign: KN4JHI
I think plug in hybrids would be the best option for most people to be honest. Of course there is compromise with it, but it gets you full electric around town and a gas motor for long trips
 
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