GM/Chevy 250 Conversion in 90/110/130

O2batsea

Well-known member
Just that putting in a big engine doesn't necessarily mean that the horsepower potential it offers will be available/attainable in real-world driving
 

rocky

Well-known member
I only know of one 250 conversion that was completed but reusing the old diesel tank clogged the fuel filter. So a new tank is on the way. Its an incredibly smooth performer. To the extent that its all too easy to think its stalled out.
 
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RDavisinVA

Technical Excellence Contributor
We swap the fuel tanks in vehicles all the time.
There is one here that was perfectly fine without leaks, that had a lot of sludge inside.
Was thinking of having the tank steam cleaned or pressure washed to get the inside free of diesel sludge, but with new tanks so cheap, why bother.
 

RDavisinVA

Technical Excellence Contributor
This should contain enough info to get started: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsepower

I think what was being implied was that if a Corvette engine is transplanted in a Defender, that it probably won't reach the optimal RPM ranges that the engine was designed to operate in.
It will have a power band defining it's performance that may not be suited to the host vehicle.
Since HP is a basic function of torque at a given RPM, an engine with 150 HP sounds low, but when you examine the power band that has 250 ftlbs of torque at say 1,600 RPM, then that would provide excellent performance and would get-up and go both on and off road.
Compare that to a power plant that has 3 times that performance and most of it goes unused because you'll either break something or loose control.

I sometimes enjoy seeing a "tricked out" Bronco or Blazer at an off road event with high output engines and ultra loud exhausts.
They rev it up and twist a driveshaft or explode a diff and there we are riding past them going slow very quietly, presumably without drawing a lot of attention to ourselves.
 

O2batsea

Well-known member
IDK if this was touched upon in this thread but the harmonics of an inline 6 are such that they are about the smoothest running engine, which is why they run so quiet. Also, the stroke over bore length makes them ideal torque producers which is what you want for an off road vehicle. I think Land Rover was on the right track when they put the 6 into the NADA 109 but the engine was such a mind boggling piece of shit that the experiment failed. If they had put in a ford or chevy six those trucks might have become famous instead of being tossed aside as too much trouble.
My Willys Hurricane 6 was a great engine even for a flathead. It just went, no matter what.
 

Robert

Well-known member
The Power I know is measured in Watts... ;)

This made me look at my Physic's book... LOL

Horsepower is a unit of power. 1hp = 0.746 kW

I'm getting old... haha
Take the year Columbus sailed and divide it by 2 for W/hp. Thats how Ive always remembered it
 

RDavisinVA

Technical Excellence Contributor
I don't think how you measure power has any relevance other than defining the "ruler" you use to evaluate and compare it.
 
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