Grenadier

TJS

Active member
Those Dana sizes match the F150 axles both regular and Max towing/Powerboost type.
The old style D44 axles were used in everything from Jeeps and Broncos to Scouts to 1/2 ton pickup rear ends. The were also used in many 1/2 and 3/4 ton front ends until the arrival of large displacement diesel engines in modern pickup trucks which were then fitted with the larger Dana 50 and 60 axles.

Modern Wrangler Rubicon models have the newer Dana 44 axles front and rear but oddly max out at a 3500lb towing capacity even with the 392 engine option. Both the Wrangler and the Grenadier have the same transmission and fairly powerful engines. Both seem to have capable transfer cases. So what is left to account for the IG's 7,700lb tow rating versus less than half that number for the Jeep? Brakes? Cooling? Something else?
 

evilfij

Well-known member
The old style D44 axles were used in everything from Jeeps and Broncos to Scouts to 1/2 ton pickup rear ends. The were also used in many 1/2 and 3/4 ton front ends until the arrival of large displacement diesel engines in modern pickup trucks which were then fitted with the larger Dana 50 and 60 axles.

Modern Wrangler Rubicon models have the newer Dana 44 axles front and rear but oddly max out at a 3500lb towing capacity even with the 392 engine option. Both the Wrangler and the Grenadier have the same transmission and fairly powerful engines. Both seem to have capable transfer cases. So what is left to account for the IG's 7,700lb tow rating versus less than half that number for the Jeep? Brakes? Cooling? Something else?
Too soft rear suspension.
 
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rocky

NAS-ROW Addict
Too soft rear suspension.

That plus the width of the axle. The width gives the tow vehicle great stability, something I’ve come to appreciate on my F150.
On 2500/3500 going to a dual rear axle gives you the same added width and stability, so important on fifth wheel RVs and multi vehicle trailers.
 

erover82

Well-known member
Factory update


I like the focus on sealing for wading
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Headlamp adjustment method appears similar to Defender

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Hefty swivels
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IIRC these are the type of spray systems that use electrostatic charge like powered coating but with urethane paints to achieve minimal overspray and even coating.
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Full body e-coat
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Carraro axles
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TJS

Active member
T-CASE.png


The outputs hang a little low but it's all gear driven.
I don't know if there's a true neutral position or not.
 

Adam

Well-known member
one of the most desirable defenders has a BMW 6 cylinder


and the Rover v8 was used in, uh... Everything.



The chevy 250 straight six was in everything from bread trucks and pickups to camaro's and chevelles.

The myth of "car engine vs truck engine" is nonsense.
 

blueboy

Well-known member
one of the most desirable defenders has a BMW 6 cylinder


and the Rover v8 was used in, uh... Everything.



The chevy 250 straight six was in everything from bread trucks and pickups to camaro's and chevelles.

The myth of "car engine vs truck engine" is nonsense.
No doubt a nice combination with a Bimmer engine yet after having a 300 TDi in a 110 feel it is a better choice. Always knew it would gets us back. Some where in Brasil.
14388AA2-1707-41BD-B628-EFF89EDC9625.jpeg
 

pfshoen

Well-known member
In general engine architecture doesn't determine whether it's more suitable for a truck or car. The torque and horsepower curves do, and those are the result of the tuning spec. Although a de-tuned V12 (e.g. Lambo LM002) can be made to work, it's overkill. All the torque and horsepower needed are well within the capabilities of 4's, 6's, and 8's. I find it puzzling that so many Corvette motors are installed in pimped out Defs. Not the one I'd pick to muddle thru the slop off pavement, or even for posing on Rodeo Drive.
 

blueboy

Well-known member
At that point in time, yes. But the days of a modern diesel in North America have long passed.
Very true and feel fortunate that we were able to enjoy a great Rover with a very reliable drivetrain in an awesome off road friendly Country. The days of many things in No. America have long passed as well.
 

blueboy

Well-known member
I find it puzzling that so many Corvette motors are installed in pimped out Defs. Not the one I'd pick to muddle thru the slop off pavement, or even for posing on Rodeo Drive.
Exactly yet seems to be an on going trend.
 

evilfij

Well-known member
In general engine architecture doesn't determine whether it's more suitable for a truck or car. The torque and horsepower curves do, and those are the result of the tuning spec. Although a de-tuned V12 (e.g. Lambo LM002) can be made to work, it's overkill. All the torque and horsepower needed are well within the capabilities of 4's, 6's, and 8's. I find it puzzling that so many Corvette motors are installed in pimped out Defs. Not the one I'd pick to muddle thru the slop off pavement, or even for posing on Rodeo Drive.
Again, I have to disagree. The 4:0 flat six engine in my GT3 has 500 PS (493 hp; 368 kW) and 460 N⋅m (339 lb⋅ft). That’s a terrible truck engine and it has a lot to do with the architecture (short stroke, 9k rpm redline). But it would be plenty of power to motivate a truck …. So too with the lambo, which was designed not as a truck engine, but an engine for high speed use (both road and in the Rambo lambo).

And the corvette engine, an LS, is a truck engine. Large displacement, high torque and most commonly found in SUVs and pickups. Especially the iron block LS are very durable (which is why you see them swapped in everything). And, barring the ones with emissions/fuel economy cylinder deactivation, it’s reliable and they are cheap, parts available everywhere (at least in the US) and inexpensive, and easy to work on.

Turbos are the obvious cheat code to get low down torque (which you want in a truck engine) out of a relatively small gas engine and that is what’s going in pretty much everything at this point. Hybrid helps too. But that’s complexity you probably don’t want in an off-road truck.
 

blueboy

Well-known member
Hybrid helps too. But that’s complexity you probably don’t want in an off-road truck.
Nicely written and informative especially on the LS. Forgot it was a cast iron block.
On the hybrid exactly and why the newer Landys are not an off-road truck.
 
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