The Very Best Thread

evilfij

Well-known member
I have one like that, but I prefer VETO:

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Thedudeabides

Active member
Since no one else has posted it, I will recommend the Blue Ridge Overland Tool Bag. It is out outer super-durable canvas bag, with inner transparent zipper pouches that you can break out separate small items (e.g. metric and imperial sockets) into each pouch. It has a exterior velcro tag area and molle straps everywhere. I keep one of these in all of my vehicles (with a giant Sams Club or Costco plastic-blow molded mechanic's tool kit dumped into it, along with my favorite additional tools) and have a second red one as a medic bag. It's far from the cheapest option, but it is exactly the right size (any larger and you wouldn't be able to lift it when full), and even a very substantial trail hand tool collection will fit in one or two of these.



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I’m a fan of the Atlas 46 tool toll. Not cheap but very handy and well made, there is a detachable version as well


They have a lot of cool products, here are the off road options

 

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mitherial

Well-known member
The VETO setup looks excellent for around the house, on a worksite etc. For a toolkit that stays in a vehicle, I prefer something more compact and square and less likely to roll around in the back when accelerating or braking.

I like that Atlas46 combination of a tool bag and detachable pouches—I think Step-22 also offers this setup. The traditional tool-roll is very practical for wrenches and screwdrivers and other long thin things, but cannot really carry loose sockets or other bits and bobs.
 

evilfij

Well-known member
Don’t get me wrong, I like tool rolls, and both the ones posted look excellent. To me, the biggest advantage of VETO is how the tools are stored. Vertical Ergonomic Tool Organization —> VETO. When you open the bag (whatever style VETO) all your tools are vertical which makes them visible and accessible without moving other tools or rooting through pouches.

I had been working out of a gape style tool bag (and have set ups in my tacoma and D90, LWB has a pelican case with tools) where I had wrench rolls, screwdriver set in a case, pliers in a pouch, etc. for those that don’t know, I usually end up working in my gravel driveway …. Don’t ask. Essentially I want all the tools I may need in something I can carry in one load so I don’t have to walk to my box to get stuff.

There were two big issues, getting tools in and out was annoying because they were not readily accessible, and if the ground was wet or had oil on it, the bag got wet. I had been just throwing tools in a plastic Hazet tote, which fixed the wet ground issue, but it is small and there is no organization.

VETO solves both the problems, I can see and get to any tool and it has a thick durable plastic base so I can set it on water, snow, oil. The base makes it very stable and no tools move or fall out even if you toss it around. The cover keeps rain and dirt out.

Now I am able to grab the veto, the Gedore red 172 piece kit, and anything in particular I know I will need and have everything in one load and have it all accessible. The VETOs also can use should straps to free up even more hands to carry stuff. And the VETO bags are built like tanks. Insanely well made. They are spendy, but with the spring promo you get a free bag when you buy one. The TECH MCT (the taller bag in the back) was $189 and I got the TP-LC for free (the one in most of the pics). Which I thought was a good deal. The MC was $145 and came with a tool pouch the TP4B which I use for electrician tools.

I have a VETO TECH PAC backpack coming (the Wiha one that comes with some tools), which might be the ultimate set up, but Wiha is being slow shipping it so I can’t comment as I don’t have it yet.
 
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mitherial

Well-known member
I looked into buying one of those Atlas 46 Yorktown tool rolls just now--and they are only made-to-order (even for their most popular items/colors?!), and stated that it would be 2-5 *months* until my order would be filled. I'm sure the bags are great (and worth the wait in some sense), but I've just been burned too many times on attempting to buy things that were "not in stock." Don't even get me started on those "Kermit" camp chairs that the Expedition Exchange guy keeps going on about--if you have a runaway bestselling item, why not expand your production capacity?
 

vtlandrover

Well-known member
I've spoken with the owner of Kermit a few times and expressed the same concern - but was blown away by the number they produce in each run (like 3,000 chairs at a time). The guy's been doing it for 20 years, so he may well take the position that bigger isn't necessarily better... I just went through a transition myself and couldn't be happier with an outfit of 3, down from 9. A lot more do re mi for a lot less overhead headache.

Do sign up for their email - it triggers at least a day's notice and I've twice been able to get in the queue in the last year. Don't give up! They're neat chairs.

UPDATE: by serendipitous coincidence, I just got a notice in my email that they're restocking on 4/21.
 

mitherial

Well-known member
Oh, everyone should take what they think is the right approach, and I certainly can't argue with running a cash-positive business for thirty years.

Also, as you say, 3,000 units is a *huge* number for "handmade" solid-wood furniture. I would have guessed 5% or 10% of that.
 

Thedudeabides

Active member
I looked into buying one of those Atlas 46 Yorktown tool rolls just now--and they are only made-to-order (even for their most popular items/colors?!), and stated that it would be 2-5 *months* until my order would be filled. I'm sure the bags are great (and worth the wait in some sense), but I've just been burned too many times on attempting to buy things that were "not in stock." Don't even get me started on those "Kermit" camp chairs that the Expedition Exchange guy keeps going on about--if you have a runaway bestselling item, why not expand your production capacity?
Strange, FWIW I suspect they are quoting longer than actual lead times to avoid disappointing customers because I ordered the Yorktown tool roll on February 28 and it shipped on March 15.

However I am still waiting on some Armistead socket wraps from that order.
 

Thedudeabides

Active member
I've spoken with the owner of Kermit a few times and expressed the same concern - but was blown away by the number they produce in each run (like 3,000 chairs at a time). The guy's been doing it for 20 years, so he may well take the position that bigger isn't necessarily better... I just went through a transition myself and couldn't be happier with an outfit of 3, down from 9. A lot more do re mi for a lot less overhead headache.

Do sign up for their email - it triggers at least a day's notice and I've twice been able to get in the queue in the last year. Don't give up! They're neat chairs.

UPDATE: by serendipitous coincidence, I just got a notice in my email that they're restocking on 4/21.
On the subject of "very best" chairs in small production runs allow me to say if anyone is ever in the market for a very nice rocking chair, Gary Weeks makes amazing stuff




It is difficult to put into words how incredibly comfortable these chairs are. You are going to spend anywhere from $2500-$5000 for a chair and footstool but they are worth every penny of that. Gary builds amazing heirloom quality furniture. The rockers are the best and most comfortable I've tried and the barstools are great as well. In addition, Gary is a pleasure to deal with
 

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Terrapintige

Well-known member
On the subject of "very best" chairs in small production runs allow me to say if anyone is ever in the market for a very nice rocking chair, Gary Weeks makes amazing stuff




It is difficult to put into words how incredibly comfortable these chairs are. You are going to spend anywhere from $2500-$5000 for a chair and footstool but they are worth every penny of that. Gary builds amazing heirloom quality furniture. The rockers are the best and most comfortable I've tried and the barstools are great as well. In addition, Gary is a pleasure to deal with
In my experience, the very best wooden rocking chair is the Thos. Moser New Gloucester Rocker. Ours hasn't gotten a ton of use recently now that our boys are both in their teens, but my ass has logged many hours of seat time holding a small child in this chair. https://www.thosmoser.com/product/new-gloucester-rocker/

We have a couple Thos. Moser pieces, but this is by far my favorite for many reasons. Like our defenders, it is our plan to pass this on to the next generation of caretakers one day, but hopefully not too soon.

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vtlandrover

Well-known member
That's a thing of beauty! Nice craftsmanship. My attaching skills are limited to crimping pierogies... wishing I had asked my mother or grandmother to teach me to sew. Clearly there's more 'art' to it than just stitching.
 
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