RRC eas struts, replace bladder or entire strut?

motap

Member
I have a 95 Classic still on the original eas struts with 93k miles. I have a leak and suspect the bags have small cracks in them.

am I better off replacing then bladders with Dunlop or getting an entire new aftermarket strut for dorman / all makes?

Was curious if the non oem parts are of decent quality.
 
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luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
Get the genuine Dunlop bladders and install them on your original pistons. I did this four years ago, along with new o-rings in all the collets and separate manual fill lines to each corner. Best project I ever finished - LWB on EAS rides like a dream.

I’ll dig up some info for you...
 

motap

Member
Awesome, that’s what I’m going to do. I found the bladders and clips, but If you have part numbers or a source for the collet and o-ring sizes that would be much appreciated!
 

motap

Member
I love the eas, I have a rrc with coils and it rides fine but drives just like a D1. Just trying to decide if I should do 215/85/16 or 245/75/16 tires...
 

luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
Here are the old notes from my EAS rebuild.

The parts stash.

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I sourced the genuine Dunlop bladders and clips from the UK, then O-rings, tubing, PTC isolating Y-splitters, and compression Schrader valves from McMaster-Carr.
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Installing the bladders on the original pistons is tough, no way around it. But there are a few tricks.

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I made a short manual fill line to charge the bladder. This consisted of a length if tubing fitted with a compression Schrader valve, then inserted into the top piston’s collet. Charge the bladder so it just firms up.


(Note: fill hose removed from these bladders, but shown in next post photos)
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Cont....
 

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luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
Now that you have a little pressure in the bladder, ever so slightly loosen the fitting for a slow, controlled air-loss, while man-handling the lower bladder/piston interface. Basically you put your hands around the bladder and force it downward with all your might, once it starts to fold over you have to fight even harder so as not to loose any ground! This is tough! You have to move quickly before too much air escapes, constrict the bladder hard enough to force it downward while not too hard to prevent progress...

Finished results, front bladder folded over itself and extending over the lower piston.

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Same for the rear.

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Next, manual inflation over-ride. This will allow you to bypass/over-ride/disconnect the EAS, and manually inflate each corner.

The parts stash (homemade salvage bracket).

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I installed a Y-fitting at each air bag, and ran a separate line, from each bladder, all the way forward to the engine bay. This takes time to review the existing air line routing, and decide exactly how/where you want to run your new lines. The single branch on the "Y" is open and runs directly to the bag itself, while the other two "feed" branches have a check valve feature - you can disconnect either or both feeds with no loss of air. I figured this as a second line of defense. After finishing this install, I manually pumped it up and let it sit overnight with EAS overridden - still at the same height the next morning!

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I'll dig through my receipt file and see if I can find part numbers for everything noted above.

Tom P.
 
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motap

Member
Thanks Tom, I had found your post on another forum as well —very helpful. I am not going to set up the manual recovery system but if you have the other part numbers that would be very helpful!

did you rebuild compressor and valve block too?
 

pmatusov

Founding Member
My hat's off. I have a few RRC air struts sitting in the garage - but I was never been able even as much as compress them manually (so the bladder folds over itself).

Speaking of replacement - not sure about Arnott's RRC bladders, but the L319/320/322 bladders from Arnott are very unpopular. To say the least.
 

luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
New bladders are more flexible than old ones, and having a little positive pressure really helps. Either way your hands hurt when you're done...
 

luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
I love the eas, I have a rrc with coils and it rides fine but drives just like a D1. Just trying to decide if I should do 215/85/16 or 245/75/16 tires...
I seriously considered 215/85's, but stuck with 225/75R16's. It drives so nice with that size, and the biggest reason is the speedo is dead accurate. That typically is not a big deal, but I have a 12-mile, 50mph route almost every time I take it out, and maintaining the torque converter lock-up at actual 50-52mph was important.
 

pmatusov

Founding Member
225/75 is very close to stock size.
I understand the desire to go taller - now that I've driven for three years on 7.50-16s, I would pick 215/85 over 245/75.
 

O2batsea

Well-known member
I have a full set of P38 assemblies that I have been planning to install for like what seems like a decade! I will try to figure out the adapter thing as my next project so they will fit the classic
 

motap

Member
Just a heads up for people looking to replace the bladders, I have only been able to find the Dunlops for the front in the UK from island4x4, they said rears are NLA --- atlantic British sells rear bladders but they are much more expensive and it's not clear what brand they are from the site.

I may end up just buying new complete assembly for the rear. Now that the weather is warm the truck seems to be holding air.
 

luckyjoe

Active member
Callsign: KD2PXL
I cannot remember if there was much dimensional difference between new front & rear bladders? I think you could use rear on front and front on rear - they are that close when new. I only carry a rear bladder in my on-board spares kit.

Also, my original factory bladders were dated 2/94, and still working in June 2015. So I hope the new genuine Dunlops will work for 20+ years. I vary the suspension height when parking so they are not folded at the same point, and long-term parking it always fully inflated.

For O-rings, the system uses 4mm, 6mm and 8mm ID. I couldn't find the relevant LR/RRC part numbers, but below are the McMaster-Carr packing lists for the parts I ordered. There is an o-ring in every push-to-connect collet (the plastic tubing connections), and the majority are 6mm.

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