These are a few of my favorite things.

chris snell

Administrator
Callsign: NW5W
Staff member
Favorite things, Defender Editon.

Do you have some little part or tool that you've used for a truck project that's just awesome? Post about it!

Things I'd love to hear about:

- The best quality zip ties anywhere
- The best hose clamps
- The best parts cleaning solution

Here are a few of my contributions to get started:

My favorite choice for wire management in wiring jobs. Once you try this, you'll never use split loom again. Expandable braided sleeving by TechFlex:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004UHJCFI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_DknYybSTMSG3Q

My favorite boxes to hold 12V receptacles: cast aluminum project boxes from Hammond Manufacturing.

I mounted one of these on the bulkhead behind the passenger seat and it can easily support three or four outlets: http://www.mouser.com/Search/m_ProductDetail.aspx?R=1550GBKvirtualkey54600000virtualkey546-1550GBK

Smaller one I mounted in the rear of the truck to hold my fridge receptacle (product image is not correct. It's black and much smaller.)
http://www.mouser.com/Search/m_ProductDetail.aspx?R=1550DBKvirtualkey54600000virtualkey546-1550DBK
 

Roverman2010

Well-known member
Hose clamps

My choice of hoseclamps these here in the US of A is ABA fully stainless steel has the rolled edges and NO perforation on the band, and the screw is a 7mm Hex no matter which size band.

Yes they cost a bit more than our cheap semi-stainless, but you can go back after years and undo them.

I get mine in bulk from Ultimategarage.com who also does Facom tools I have no connection with this company.

Now if I was back in the UK the real Jubilee Clip would be first choice.
 

The_Vermonster

Well-known member
I bought a 300ft black twist tie spool with a built in cutter. I mostly use it around the house, but it helped a lot when rewiring the dash lights. With a pair of needle nose pliers you can really tighten it up. It keep some of the messier looms from taking up so much room, and getting tangled with single wires. You can also position wires with a quick twist around the wire and a twist around something else. So far it has been very permanent.
 

Ray_G

Well-known member
In addition to the thin wall long 9/16 socket (aka the driveshaft tool) noted above, I have found that a 9/16th's swivel socket can come in handy for less than optimal drive shaft removal situations: http://www.sears.com/craftsman-9-16-in-socket-12-pt-flex/p-00943255000P?sid=IDx01192011x000001&gclid=CjwKEAjwzKPGBRCS55Oe46q9hCkSJAAMvVuM_A9DnVriXA1TpbJNNzuRykTOG_aYYnDNV7K4-eni5hoCUzvw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Credit for that idea really should go to Tony Brooks since he introduced me to the idea like a decade ago.

For working on the suspension or other times when a stable lifting is desired I have found that I turn to combination jackstand/jacks quite often, as can be seen on the passenger side here:
2016-07-10 16.01.19.jpg
Avail from TSC or online: http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/powerbuilt-3-ton-all-in-one-jack

I think most folks use tool rolls but one thing I have found that is more optimal for wrenches is a smaller wrench roll, my particular favorite is a surplus military unit: http://www.omahas.com/tool-roll-nylon-11-pocket#.WMmxHY61syc
For a size perspective they are the ones on the left, perfect for wrench sets (I normally carry both ratcheting and box ends):
1510 laid out.JPG

r-
Ray
 

UnfrozenCaveman

Well-known member
Not for the Rovers, but for the VW.

The pinch weld is a crappy place to jack on and I'm tired of looking for that scrap of 2x4 with the slot sawn in it.

I got two practice hockey pucks at the sporting goods store and cut a groove with my 1/4" chisel.

Ta daa...no more worrying about lifting the VW.
 

Jeff B

Well-known member
This is one of my favorite things.
I think was called a 220*F sump heater.
Steve Hoare(who is the current El Presidente of Alloy & Grit) wrote about this back in Land Rover Monthly circa 2004.
I've had it stuck on the sump ever since.
One time, I got curious and turned it on when the air temp was in the low tens and then checked it with an ir thermometer an hour later and the pad was reading about 160-170F.

Currently, If we have a cold night in the 20's or teens, I plug it into my remote controlled outlet and just turn it on an hour or so before I leave for work.


.
 

Attachments

Kevin88RRC

Well-known member
This is one of my favorite things.
I think was called a 220*F sump heater.
Steve Hoare(who is the current El Presidente of Alloy & Grit) wrote about this back in Land Rover Monthly circa 2004.
I've had it stuck on the sump ever since.
One time, I got curious and turned it on when the air temp was in the low tens and then checked it with an ir thermometer an hour later and the pad was reading about 160-170F.

Currently, If we have a cold night in the 20's or teens, I plug it into my remote controlled outlet and just turn it on an hour or so before I leave for work.


.
This has been on my to do / wish list for a long time.
 
Top