Portable Air

Viton

Well-known member
Using CO2 is only a "quick" solution to airing up, in 1 week you will loose a minimum 5 psi as the gas leaks through the tire rubber, eventually it will all leak out. You'll have to let it all out & do it right with atmospheric air eventually.
I use a Viare continuous duty pump, be sure to get the continuous duty pump. Takes about 20 minutes to go from 20 psi to 38 for all 4 tires.
 

Red90

Well-known member
Using CO2 is only a "quick" solution to airing up, in 1 week you will loose a minimum 5 psi as the gas leaks through the tire rubber, eventually it will all leak out. You'll have to let it all out & do it right with atmospheric air eventually.
I use a Viare continuous duty pump, be sure to get the continuous duty pump. Takes about 20 minutes to go from 20 psi to 38 for all 4 tires.
Huh? What science are you suggesting for this theory?
 

Napalm00

Well-known member
I'm mounting a ARB High Output CKMA12 in the seat box of our 90 to operate lockers. Have an old RRC air ride suspension tank. I was thinking of plumbing the compressor into the tank so there is enough air for bursts with an impact etc. Question is, what do folks do about moisture with these onboard systems. Typically air thats been compressed to 150psi is around 300 degree's as it leaves the compressor head which means condensation. We have had 5 ft of rain here in the past 6 mos, Virginia is very humid these days.
Have used a 20lb co2 tank for a decade and a half but the lockers are forcing a change.

Maybe one of these ? they seem really high quality

https://www.mudstuff.co.uk/gmb-fender-locker.html
 

Uncle Douglas

Well-known member
Why would the lockers force a change? They use basically no air, so the CO2 tank would be fine.
Ehhh. Easier for me to mount what I have up. Took it in trade for labor on a NAS 90 we are taking back to stock along with the great basin built 4;10's with Arb's and Great Basin 30 to 1 low range tcase. Have seen co2 tanks operating lockers in the past and know it works well, just like the idea of getting rid of the tank. Too much crap inside the little truck as it is.
After looking @ mounting the compressor in the left seat box- that isnt happening. Guess I'll mount it under the bonnet.
 
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RBBailey

NAS-ROW Addict
Callsign: KF7KFZ
After looking @ mounting the compressor in the left seat box- that isnt happening. Guess I'll mount it under the bonnet.
I have some padding in the bottom of the passenger seat tool box, an ARB tire fix kit, my breaker bar with a socket for the lugs, the compressor and hose, and a fire extinguisher all tucked in there. No fancy install for the air, but this will do.
 

Red90

Well-known member
Time to get serious Doug and put in an engine driven compressor. You never look back after you have a 15 CFM compressor available. And they are nearly free if you can fab.
 

Uncle Douglas

Well-known member
I have some padding in the bottom of the passenger seat tool box, an ARB tire fix kit, my breaker bar with a socket for the lugs, the compressor and hose, and a fire extinguisher all tucked in there. No fancy install for the air, but this will do.
That space is occupied by the fuel tank on an early 90
 

Red90

Well-known member
Incorrect. First, you are using words that have no applicability to this. Soluble, absorb and evaporate do not apply to any of this. CO2 has higher permeability through rubber. But...the permeation rates of any of these gases through a tire is so low that it is nearly immeasurable. Just a bunch of kool-aid to fool the masses that do not understand science or can't perform simple testing.
 

javelinadave

Administrator
Staff member
I have a Viar 400P, it's fast, quiet. If somebody stole it I would replace it with the same exact one.

I have a Powertank that sits sadly in the corner of the garage. It is used when I need a nailer or staple job somewhere in the house or to blow out the refrigerator coils.
 

Napalm00

Well-known member
Incorrect. First, you are using words that have no applicability to this. Soluble, absorb and evaporate do not apply to any of this. CO2 has higher permeability through rubber. But...the permeation rates of any of these gases through a tire is so low that it is nearly immeasurable. Just a bunch of kool-aid to fool the masses that do not understand science or can't perform simple testing.
Lol what a jerk
 

javelinadave

Administrator
Staff member
Incorrect. First, you are using words that have no applicability to this. Soluble, absorb and evaporate do not apply to any of this. CO2 has higher permeability through rubber. But...the permeation rates of any of these gases through a tire is so low that it is nearly immeasurable. Just a bunch of kool-aid to fool the masses that do not understand science or can't perform simple testing.
So John, explain me this. I air up with my CO2 Powertank and have to add more air then next weekend to bring it back up to the pressure it was when I aired up with the CO2 BUT if I air up with my Vaiar I don’t have to add anything the following weekend.
 

Red90

Well-known member
I've done tire permeability testing in during many years of tire load testing. If the tire is not leaking, the loss rate in pressure will be negligible. What people see is their slow leak is worse with the CO2. Your modern tubeless tire is designed to not be permeable. That link above, the guy is seeing loss in both tires. They are both leaking. Most likely slow bead leaks which are very common. If you want to do a real test, you need to start with a tire that you can show has zero pressure loss when on air, then refill with CO2 and compare.
 
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